Emacs Archaeology


Recently a friend asked me for my Emacs configuration. RMS would excommunicate me from the church if I didn’t make my configuration available to any who asked so, of course, I started packaging it up and shipping it off to my friend. However, to help my friend it seemed reasonable to explain what all I’ve accumulated over the last few years, highlight some areas she might want to customize differently, and to point out some modes and tools I find particularly helpful in my day to day work.

After opening up a terminal and poking around in my ~/etc/emacs.d directory I started to realize that after all this time I wasn’t entirely familiar with my Emacs configuration either. Of course, no one has any geek cred at all if they can’t explain how their editors configured so I started digging in to remind myself what the heck all this stuff does.  
Here’s a few numbers. Over the years I’ve written ~1500 lines of elisp code spread across 27 *.el files and accumulated another ~60,000 lines of dependencies (mostly downloaded from EmacsWiki and/or Emacs Fu).

In any event, over the next few weeks I’ll be cleaning things up a bit and posting more about some of the things about Emacs I really love.

If anyone’s interested in my current configuration I have a bitbucket repo (maybe I should move it to
github?) here (https://bitbucket.org/steder/dotfiles) with all of my
dotfiles including the emacs stuff if you’d like to take a look.